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Panama City POPS Orchestra explore the art and artistry of David Bowie

b3d0fc_f5b102c6d5004464a05385773ec83ad8mv2David Robert Jones was born in London on January 8, 1947. He died January 10, 2016 two days after his 69th birthday and the release of his twenty-fifth (and final) album, Blackstar. Better known to the world as David Bowie, he changed artistic personas – notably Ziggy Stardust, Major Tom and the Thin White Duke – even more frequently than he changed his name. Along the way he bent the rules on gender identity decades before doing so became an acceptable part of everyday conversation.

He also bent the musical rules, continuously pushing popular music beyond its frontier boundaries, and in doing so became a highly influential artistic trailblazer (for example, he almost singlehandedly invented the Glam Rock genre). Despite the fluidity of his musical approach, he consistently infused his music with a level of sophistication and intellectual vigor otherwise too frequently lacking in pop music, always raising the bar for a musical genre constantly in danger of becoming frivolously banal and predictably imitative. His songwriting throughout decades displayed deeply introspective and philosophical expressions of a lifetime spent wrangling with his own spirituality, political evolution, sexuality and social attitudes (including towards race).

But his art extended well beyond the musical stage and recording studio as he brilliantly transferred his innate theatrical knack to acting roles both in front of the camera (most famously as Jareth the Goblin King in Labyrinth) and in live theater, often playing mysterious villains, outcasts or, occasionally, himself in cameo appearances. He was also a critically acclaimed painter, focusing primarily on the human form (including a series of self-portraits) rendered in usually grotesque, boldly pigmented neoexpressionist daubs and swirls. He was also an obsessive collector of contemporary masters with a collection valued at over $12 million at the time of his death.

Not enough water has passed under the bridge to take a fully critical assessment of his cultural contribution, but it seems fair to venture a rash judgment by claiming he was the William Blake for our age. Iconoclastic, esoteric – seemingly perched, like his famous character in “Space Oddity,” miles above planet Earth, a perspective from which he was able to observe, yet still not fully rationalize, the quotidian comings-and-goings of his fellow mortals.

On January 8, the eve of the 70th birthday of this artistic genius, Panama City POPS Orchestra will present a season extra, “The Music of David Bowie.” Under the baton of Richard Carsey, the POPS will perform a musical tribute of David Bowie’s repertoire scored by the critically acclaimed Windborne Production Company, which has produced similar tributes to such iconic rock legends as Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, The Eagles, The Doors, Queen, The Rolling Stones, U2, Journey and Michael Jackson.

The POPs will be joined at the Marina Civic Center at 7:30 by vocalist Brody Dolyniuk along with a full rock orchestra as they guide the audience on a musical odyssey spanning Bowie’s entire career, performing hits such as “Space Oddity,” “Changes,” “Rebel Rebel,” “China Girl” and “Under Pressure.” Tickets for what promises to be an unforgettable night start at $19.50 and are available online by visiting www.panamacitypops.org.


Panama City fishing guide provides an ultimate dock-to-dish experience.

charterHow many times have you stood helplessly by, biting your tongue while you watched a friend completely botch preparing and cooking a nice, clean piece of fish he (or she) labored all day in the hot sun, at the stern of a rocking boat, miles offshore, to land? Next time you plan an offshore fishing excursion in Northwest Florida, you may want to avoid committing a similar culinary faux pas and subjecting your dinner guests to overcooked cobia with the consistency of a retread tire. How’s that, you ask? For too many occasional fishermen, catching fish is a bit like the dog that chases the bus and doesn’t know what to do with it once he’s caught it.

Captain Todd Jones knows the waters (both inshore and offshore) around Panama City so well he could navigate them blindfolded on a moonless night. He also knows how to find his way to a good business idea. Captain Todd operates out of Sun Harbor Marina, docking his 27-foot center console Seacraft just steps away from Shipyard Grill. Like most charter captains, he has always cleaned the days catch and iced it down for his happy, worn-out clients before sending them on their way with a mess of clean fish and a load of unanswered questions about what to do with it once they get it home.

One evening, soon after Shipyard Grill opened, he noticed his clients walking with their bags of fresh catch right past the front door and patio of the restaurant, and the idea appeared to him as clear as a channel marker on St. Andrews Bay: why not offer clients the opportunity to have the restaurant professionally and expertly cook the fish they worked so hard (and spent their hard-earned dollars) to catch?

“There are many advantages to this ‘Hook and Cook’ approach,” says Captain Todd of his idea. First, he notes that somebody who rarely cooks the wide variety of edible Gulf fish they’re most likely to land avoids the stress of preparing it incorrectly.  Secondly, there’s no mess to clean up afterwards. Thirdly, fishermen often travel with spouses, other family members or friends who don’t join the expedition but still want to share the bounty, which Hook and Cook allows. Finally, fresh frozen fish is better than store-bought fish, but never-frozen swimming-this-morning dock-to-dish fish is in a stratosphere of its own.

Now, instead of lugging your fish home to Atlanta or Birmingham – or even Ohio – in a cooler strapped to the hitch-all of your Suburban, you walk 20 (more or less) steps from the boat to the dock-side restaurant, present your bag of fish and choose one of three preparations for your catch (fried, blackened or grilled – which the restaurant charges an average $13 to $15 to cook) along with two sides. (Although not quite as convenient, in addition to Shipyard Grill, Captain Todd can also deliver you with your fish to Captain’s Table Fish House Restaurant in Historic St. Andrews or to Treasure Island Seafood Market to be cleaned and delivered to J. Michael’s in Downtown Panama City.) Then you head back to your lodging to wash up and fetch your family and friends, and return with them to the Shipyard Grill to proudly treat them to an unforgettable meal that you caught four hours earlier, as you regale them with your fish tales. One of those people will certainly buy you a drink and toast your virtues as a fisherman and a host.

Be sure to check out Captain Todd’s episode on Hook and Cook on Emerald Tales airing in January on the Pursuit Channel (check local listings).  To book a charter with Captain Todd, please call 850-819-5829


Panama City’s strategic location on St. Andrews Bay has played an important role in the destination’s history as an anglers paradise. Similarly, the ideal wind conditions have established Panama City as a world-class sailing destination, with travelers from around the globe envying the constant breezes and calm waters of St. Andrews Bay and the Gulf. Sprawling more than 68,000 acres behind the protection of the Gulf of Mexico shoreline, St. Andrews Bay is home to abundant aquatic life.

PanamaCityFL16-7270The bay spans more than 20 miles and includes a wealth of saltwater flats and seagrass beds that offer a rich bounty. Redfish, Speckled Trout, Black Drum, Cobia, Sheepshead and Flounder are just a few of the species that populate these channels.

The clear waters of this extensive ecosystem are ideal for both novice and expert anglers. Numerous charters and guides offer year-round off-shore fishing opportunities for various seasonal species. Bottom fishing yields grouper, snapper, mahi-mahi, mackerel and amberjack. Trolling is an ideal method for hooking both Spanish and king mackerel, cobia and jack crevalles. Sport fishing for sailfish and marlin provides heart-thumping excitement during a true test of endurance and skill.

Offering near perfect winds that many coastal communities envy, visitors to Panama City have the opportunity to sail in the deepest and largest protected bay in the area. Long revered as a sailing destination, Panama City is home to numerous regattas throughout the year such as the A-Class Catamaran North American Championships.

Boaters love Panama City with more marinas per capita than many similarly sized coastal destinations and charters providing ready access for water based excursions. Shelling expeditions to unpopulated barrier islands, such as Shell Island are readily available to any guests wishing to explore the bay area by water. Download a free Visitors Guide to learn about the crystal blue waters of Destination Panama City.


Panama City is on the cusp of becoming an artist’s and art lover’s mecca since establishing itself as a diverse and dynamic destination for both the performing and visual arts. “Panama City is on the rise as a destination for the arts, and we are thrilled to welcome visitors who come to experience our bustling arts scene in addition to the world-class water activities we have long been known for,” said Jennifer Vigil, President and CEO of Destination Panama City. “In the past, our culture has largely been guided by its proximity to the water, so our evolution as an artistic destination is the perfect complement.”

Downtown serves as Panama City’s art and theater district, anchored by the stage of the 1936 art deco Martin Theater, the 2,500-seat auditorium at the Marina Civic Center and the City Arts Co-Op, a 7,000-square-foot facility with performance and studio space. These venues host a range of events from local talent to international touring acts and Broadway performances.

The Panama City Center for the Arts provides cultural enrichment through a wide range of art courses including painting, sculpture and digital design. Each spring, The Centre and Bay Arts Alliance host the Bay Annual, a juried art contest and exhibition featuring the work of local artists residing in 16 Panhandle counties.

From Music Matters, a grassroots campaign credited with revitalizing the Panama City music scene, to the 200-person Ukulele Orchestra of St. Andrews, Panama City’s thriving music scene is experiencing a major breakthrough. In the Fall, downtown Panama City comes alive with light, sound and art during Public Eye SOAR, a digital projection art festival that transforms downtown’s streetscape with animations and films.


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